Korean Art and Korean Antiques
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Korean : Paintings : Pre 1980 item #1393162 (stock #1378)
Korean Art and Antiques
$750.00
Large Crane Painting by Famous Korean Buddhist Monk Painter Poet Su An Sunim (born 1940). Gracefully rendered in the brushstrokes of the contemplative Zen Buddhist style. The crane is an ancient symbol of immortality and long life, and is held in such high esteem in Korea its image adorns only the highest rank badges. The crane has further special meaning in Buddhism. The bodhisattvas change themselves into cranes so they can fly around the world helping those in need. In this paining of the bodhisattva crane in flight, he has an observant, compassionate eye and his wings are open wide to shield those in need of protection. The recent exhibition of Su An Sunim's work at the Zen Buddhist Temple in New York City was the most highly-attended exhibition ever presented by the Korean Art Society. At that exhibition, Su An Sunim's works of similar size and quality sold for multiples of the prices we are asking here. Framed in a traditional Korean wood frame. Frame: 60 x 18.5 inches, 152.5 x 47 cm; Painting: 50 x 11 inches, 127.5 x 27.5 cm.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Korean : Paintings : Pre 1900 item #1393068 (stock #1377)
Korean Art and Antiques
$1,500.00
Fine 19th Century Korean Royal Court Artist Painting of Pheasants and Azaleas. Hwajodo (Bird and Flower Paintings) have a centuries-long tradition in Korea. Pheasants are an ancient symbol of happy marriage and family duties, and also represent royalty and the peace and order their reign should bring. The azaleas are a symbol of beauty. The maple tree is a symbol of contentment. So the entire composition represents a beautiful, peaceful and contented marriage. Mounted on a beautiful silk scroll. Ink and colors on paper. Scroll: 59 x 16.75 inches, 150 x 42.5 cm; Painting: 28.5 x 13, 72 x 33 cm.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Korean : Paintings : Pre 1980 item #1393031 (stock #1376)
Korean Art and Antiques
$700.00
Rare Framed Calligraphy by the Last Korean Princess, Yi Bangja (1901 - 1989). A beautiful piece of Korean history created by the last member of the royal household to reside in Korea's royal palace. Princess Yi Bangja is much beloved by the Korean people. She devoted her entire life to the education of mentally and physically handicapped people, and worked tirelessly to support them. She is the subject of television dramas, stage dramas, operas, movies, and books, including her autobiography, "The World is One." This piece reads 위기지학 (ui-gi-ji-hak). It means "Learn for self-cultivation." In other words, don't get an education just so you can show off and gain riches; do it to develop moral character. Confucius said in the Analects, “People in ancient times learned in order to cultivate their own moral character. People today learn just to impress others.” Frame: 36.5 x 20 inches, 93 x 51 cm; Calligraphy: 26 x 11.5 inches, 66 x 29 cm.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Korean : Paintings : Pre 1980 item #1393030 (stock #1375)
Korean Art and Antiques
$700.00
Rare Framed Calligraphy by the Last Korean Princess, Yi Bangja (1901 - 1989). A beautiful piece of Korean history created by the last member of the royal household to reside in Korea's royal palace. Princess Yi Bangja is much beloved by the Korean people. She devoted her entire life to the education of mentally and physically handicapped people, and worked tirelessly to support them. She is the subject of television dramas, stage dramas, operas, movies, and books, including her autobiography, "The World is One." This piece reads 선정기심 (seon-jeong-gi-sim). It means "Correct your mind first," or a very modern translation would be "Get your mind right, first." From the text 大學 . Frame: 24.5 x 18 inches, 62 x 46 cm; Calligraphy: 15 x 12.5 inches, 38 x 32 cm.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Korean : Paintings : Pre 1900 item #1393029 (stock #1374)
Korean Art and Antiques
$1,500.00
Orchids are an ancient Korean symbol of purity, modesty, and virtue. The rock symbolizes eternity, so the combination of orchids and rock have the meaning of eternal adherence to principle. Talented painters of orchids were and still are held in the highest regard. Though Daewongun (Prince Yi Ha Eung) is often cited as the greatest painter of orchids, most scholars now agree that it was Kim Eung Won aka Soho (1855-1921) who was painting many of the paintings for which Daewongun took credit and which Daewongun signed. Daewongun was, of course, a great painter of orchids, but most agree now that Kim Eung Won may deserve the title of greatest. His paintings sell for a fraction of the price of Daewongun's paintings, at least for now. That can be expected to change as the general public catches up with the scholarship on the subject. Ink on paper. Frame: 60.75 x 18.5 inches, 154 x 47 cm; Painting: 49 x 13 inches, 124.5 x 33 cm. (A much smaller Daewongun painting recently sold at Christie's for $12,500 on March 18, 2014).