Korean Art and Antiques
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Korean : Paintings : Pre 1800 item #1493703 (stock #1556)
Korean Art and Antiques
$9,000.00
The Only Antique Korean Painting of "Buddha with the Sun and Moon Spirit" Ever Offered for Sale outside of Korea. And perhaps the only 18th century Korean painting with this subject matter ever offered anywhere. Exceedingly Rare and Beautiful. The pair of deities seated at the front of the painting from right to left are the Spirits of the Sun (Ilgangcheonja) and the Moon (Weolgangcheonja). They are known collectively as Ilweol Sinjang. The celestial orbs are in their crowns and overhead. The Sun Spirit's sunlight scatters darkness and misfortune and brings prosperity. The Moon Spirit relieves people's anxiety with moonlight. Buddha is attended by boys (Dongja) on each side of him. Frame: 40 x 23.5 inches, 101 x 60 cm. Painting: 33.5 x 18 inches, 85 x 46 cm.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Korean : Paintings : Pre 1900 item #1493691 (stock #1555)
Korean Art and Antiques
$4,000.00
Rare and beautiful late 19th Century painting of the Korean Mountain Spirit (Sansin) with a scarce sacred white tiger and boy attendant (Dongja) alongside a stream in an idyllic mountain landscape on finely handwoven silk mounted on a gold silk scroll. Sansin's tiger is the animal lord of the mountain and the messenger for Sansin and the enforcer of his will. The white tiger holds special meaning in Korea. It was believed that when a tiger survived challenges and attained wisdom, his fur turned white and he became a sacred spirit. The tiger is a national symbol of Korea and the white tiger was the mascot of the 2018 Winter Olympics in Korea. Very few antique Korean paintings with white tigers are in existence. The Dongja holds Sansin's wood staff, as gnarled as the pine tree under which he sits. The pine tree is a symbol of longevity and tenacity. In a country where most of the land is covered by mountains, it makes sense that Sansin the Mountain Spirit is the most revered of Korea's native deities. He is the god most often appealed to for fertility, prosperity, and longevity. This Sansin is a great example of the open-minded syncretism of ancient Korean belief. He is a deity of purely Korean Shamanist origin, crowned by a delicately painted Confucian hat, wearing a Buddhist robe, and being attended by a Dongja boy in a utopian Daoist mountain landscape. Sansin paintings can be found in the Sansin-gak shrine of Korean Buddhist temples. Gold silk mount: 59 x 31.5 inches (80 cm). Painting: 36.5 x 25.5 inches (93 x 65 cm).
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Korean : Paintings : Pre 1900 item #1490983 (stock #1553)
Korean Art and Antiques
$2,000.00
Fine and Rare Korean 19th Century Guardian Painting in Gold Leaf and Mineral Pigments on Silk in Excellent Condition with Vivid Colors. This would have hung on the door of a home to protect the household. This is the finest example of a door guardian painting we have ever seen. Frame: 22 x 10 inches, 56 x 25.5 cm; Painting: 19.5 x 7.5 inches, 50 x 19 cm.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Korean : Paintings : Pre 1900 item #1490894 (stock #1552)
Korean Art and Antiques
$5,000.00
The only authentic pair of 19th Century Korean paintings of Generals ever offered for sale. Such painted figures were popular guardians of business because of their two-thousand-year history as paradigms of victory and loyalty. This pair, because of its high quality, was undoubtedly commissioned by a prominent 19th century Korean merchant to bless, protect, and bring prosperity to their business. There would have been a shaman ritual at the consecration of this pair of paintings at the place of business. On the right is the legendary 3rd century General Kwan-u, instantly identified by his crane feather fan. He is attended by a boy (Dongja) serving him the mythical peaches of immortality. On the left is Janggun, the ancient mythological general. He is holding a military trident. There are many 20th century reproductions of these types of paintings. Authentic Joseon Dynasty examples like this exist only in museums. And even in museums, a pair like this is very rare. You can discern authenticity by the material and quality, such as fine hand-woven silk and mineral pigments that give warmth and depth and are vivid but not garish like modern chemical paints. The originals like this are valued not only for their superior artistry, but also for the connection they provide to the culture and spirituality of ancient authentic Korean shamanism. Much of modern Korean art and culture is rooted in shamanism. Its influence pervades Korean society, whether or not one is aware of it. This is not art for art’s sake. Within the broad realm of Korean folk art, shaman art expresses the deepest desires of the Korean people. That is why these wonderful creations speak so directly to persons of all persuasions, even today. Frame: 40 x 26 inches, 102 x 66 cm. Painting: 34.5 x 20.5 inches, 88 x 52 cm.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Korean : Paintings : Pre 1900 item #1490864 (stock #1551)
Korean Art and Antiques
Price on Request
The last rare Joseon Dynasty Munjado-Chaekgeori combination screen offered for sale was a decade ago at auction. It will likely be at least that long until you see another, if you ever see one for sale again at all. Even most museums have been unable to find one to acquire. The Cleveland Museum has a fine example. This rare combination of Munjado and Chaekgeori was painted only in the Gangwon Province. Munjado screens have eight pictorial ideographs depicting the Eight Confucian Virtues: Hyo (Filial Piety), Je (Fraternity), Chung (Loyalty), Shin (Trust), Ye (Propriety), Ui (Justice), Yeom (Integrity), and Chi (Conscience). Unique to Korean munjado screens are paintings of various creatures that since ancient times have symbolized the virtue they accompany here. Confucian values were regarded as the cornerstones of Korean society and Munjado screen paintings representing them were used as daily reminders to observe the Eight Virtues. Chaekgeori screens feature scholarly accoutrements such as books and writing tables, brush pots and scrolls, fans, along with items that would adorn the scholar's study such as potted flowers and plants, and fruit in bowls. Within the Confucian society of the Joseon Dynasty (1392-1910), scholars were highly respected and Chaekgeori screens were typically displayed behind the desk in a study to convey an air of dignity, luxury, and a reverence for scholarship. These screens were also intended to instill these values in the children of the household. Ink and colors on paper. Total dimensions: 65 x 140 inches, 165 x 356 cm. Each painting: 65 x 17.5 inches, 165 x 44.5 cm.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Korean : Paintings : Pre 1900 item #1485934 (stock #1522)
Korean Art and Antiques
SOLD
Geese and Reeds Painting (Noando) on fine silk mounted on luxurious gold silk by Yang Ki Hun aka Seokyeon (1843-1897) from Pyeongyang, signed Seokyeon. Yang Ki Hun's signature 'boneless' style (painting without outlines, using ink washes) beautifully captures light and shade. The literal meaning of 'noando' is reed and geese painting, but it is a play on words, as 'no' means both reed and old, and 'an' means both geese and comfort ('do' means painting). So 'noan' can mean 'reed and geese' or 'old comfort', and so a painting of geese and reeds symbolized a wish for a comfortable and peaceful old age. This particular painting has further meaning because it depicts two pair of geese. Geese were believed to mate for life, so this painting symbolizes eternal love, and the wish for a couple to grow old together in peace and comfort. Yang Ki Hun was a member of the Royal Academy of Painting in the 19th Century. He made a living by painting for the king and his court, and also by selling his paintings in Pyeongyang. Here are two great quotes from Yang Ki Hun's contemporary, the painter and calligrapher Chi Un Yeong (aka Paekryeon): "Yang Ki Hun's paintings stir up my jealousy because they seem completely freed from all ideas and restraints". And after Seokyeon (Yang Ki Hun) passed away, Chi Un Yeong wrote, "Seokyeon told me that when he stayed on Neungna Island for a few years some time ago, he often saw geese fly in and land on a reed field, so he was able to paint them in a realistic way. His words still linger vividly in my ears. I remember playing with him thirty years ago in the Taedong River, and it seems so far away and dream-like." Ink on paper. Silk Mounting: 76 x 19.5 inches, 193 x 49.5 cm; Painting: 44 x 14 inches, 112 x 35.5 cm. The fifth photo here shows the market price for Yang Ki Hun paintings, which is much higher than the attractive price at which we are offering this fine painting.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Korean : Paintings : Pre 1900 item #1485590 (stock #1520)
Korean Art and Antiques
SOLD
This is the only calligraphy by Kim Eung Won aka Soho (1855-1921) we have ever seen offered for sale. His skill was so revered that the prince Daewongun paid Kim Eung Won to paint many of the works for which the prince took credit. Ink on paper. Mount: 73 x 15 inches (185.5 x 38 cm), Calligraphy: 51 x 12 inches (130 x 30 cm).
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Korean : Paintings : Pre 1900 item #1484305 (stock #1518)
Korean Art and Antiques
$20,000.00
You rarely see 19th Century Korean tiger paintings offered for sale anymore, especially in excellent condition like this one. The last time we had one was 15 years ago, and it will probably be at least that long until have another one to offer. When they do come up in auctions now, they sell for five figures. That's because there is nothing anywhere like Joseon Era Korean tiger folk paintings. Tigers in Korean paintings are not ferocious. They are humorous and full of personality. And each one is unique, like this fellow here with his quizzical and lovable face as he is being addressed by the magpies. This was a favorite symbol of the common folks and represented the people speaking truth to power. The pine tree is a symbol of longevity and wisdom. The azaleas symbolize beauty. This painting is very "Korean." It is painted in ink and colors on traditional and old hanji paper. Korean tiger folk paintings are never signed. Frame: 45 x 29 inches (114 x 74 cm), Painting: 38 x 22 inches (97 x 56 cm).
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Korean : Paintings : Pre 1900 item #1482532 (stock #1516)
Korean Art and Antiques
SOLD
Geese and Reeds Painting (Noando) mounted on luxurious gold silk by Yang Ki Hun aka Seokyeon (1843-1897) from Pyeongyang, signed Seokyeon. Yang Ki Hun's signature 'boneless' style (painting without outlines, using ink washes) beautifully captures light and shade. The literal meaning of 'noando' is reed and geese painting, but it is a play on words, as 'no' means both reed and old, and 'an' means both geese and comfort ('do' means painting). So 'noan' can mean 'reed and geese' or 'old comfort', and so a painting of geese and reeds symbolized a wish for a comfortable and peaceful old age. This particular painting has further meaning because it depicts two pair of geese. Geese were believed to mate for life, so this painting symbolizes eternal love, and the wish for a couple to grow old together in peace and comfort. Yang Ki Hun was a member of the Royal Academy of Painting in the 19th Century. He made a living by painting for the king and his court, and also by selling his paintings in Pyeongyang. Here are two great quotes from Yang Ki Hun's contemporary, the painter and calligrapher Chi Un Yeong (aka Paekryeon): "Yang Ki Hun's paintings stir up my jealousy because they seem completely freed from all ideas and restraints". And after Seokyeon (Yang Ki Hun) passed away, Chi Un Yeong wrote, "Seokyeon told me that when he stayed on Neungna Island for a few years some time ago, he often saw geese fly in and land on a reed field, so he was able to paint them in a realistic way. His words still linger vividly in my ears. I remember playing with him thirty years ago in the Taedong River, and it seems so far away and dream-like." Ink on paper. Silk Mounting: 67 x 16.5 inches, 170 x 42 cm; Painting: 48.75 x 12 inches, 124 x 30.5 cm. The third photo here shows the market price for Yang Ki Hun paintings, which is much higher than the attractive price at which we are offering this fine painting.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Korean : Paintings : Pre 1800 item #1479088 (stock #1509)
Korean Art and Antiques
$15,000.00
Only Pair of Korean Enlightened Saints (Nahan) Paintings Ever Offered for Sale. Set in beautiful landscapes, the Nahan on the right has subdued a demon who is supplicating before him. 18th Century. The tables and books display the Korean reverse perspective technique that would later be made popular in 19th century Chaekgeorri paintings of scholar's bookshelves. (Reverse perspective did not exist in Chinese and Japanese paintings of the 18th and 19th centuries.) Colors on paper. 30 x 13.5 inches, 76 x 34 cm each.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Korean : Paintings : Pre 1900 item #1477606 (stock #1501)
Korean Art and Antiques
$9,000.00
Fine, Rare Eight-Panel Painting by Revered Korean Artist Kim Eung Won aka Soho (1855-1921). Similar to the Kim Eung Won screen in the royal Changdeok Palace. Orchids are an ancient Korean symbol of purity, modesty, and virtue. The rock symbolizes eternity, so the combination of orchids and rock have the meaning of eternal adherence to principle. The orchid grows in remote places, but its fragrance spreads over the land, just as the scholar often works in isolation, but through their scholarly and ethical works their influence is felt throughout the land. Talented painters of orchids were and still are held in the highest regard. Though Daewongun (Prince Yi Ha Eung) is often cited as the greatest painter of orchids, most scholars now agree it was Kim Eung Won who was creating many of the paintings for which Prince Daewongun took credit and which Daewongun signed. Daewongun was, of course, a great painter of orchids, but most agree now that Kim Eung Won may deserve the title of greatest. His paintings sell for a fraction of the price of Daewongun's paintings, at least for now. That can be expected to change as the general public catches up with the scholarship on the subject. The last photo here is of the only other Kim Eung Won screen offered for sale. The "sale" price is more than double the price we are asking here. This is the only Kim Eung Won eight-panel painting we have ever offered in our 18 years in business. Ink on paper. 54 x 14 inches, 137.5 x 35.5 cm unmounted. (A much smaller and single Daewongun painting sold at Christie's for $12,500 on March 18, 2014).
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Korean : Paintings : Pre 1910 item #1477353 (stock #1500)
Korean Art and Antiques
$9,000.00
Rare and Grand Eight-Panel Chaekgeori Still-Life Screen painting on All-Original Mounting. Chaekgeori literally translates to "books and things," and the things are scholar's accoutrements. It is rare to find such an old and important screen on its original silk and wood mounting. They are usually remounted. So this is a once-in-a-lifetime acquisition opportunity for a serious connoisseur of fine art and Korean culture. This genre of painting is uniquely Korean and was created by King Jeongjo in 1791. The shelves of the painting are adorned with books and objects collected from other countries, illuminating the ideas of the erudite and cosmopolitan scholar. The spatial illusion of reverse perspective used in early examples of chaekgeori is masterfully rendered here. This screen inspired the pursuit of knowledge and reverence for cultural values in the many ritual ceremonies at which it was employed over the decades. 141 x 60 inches, 358 x 152 cm.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Korean : Paintings : Pre 1900 item #1477075 (stock #1498)
Korean Art and Antiques
$1,000.00
Orchids and Rocks Painting by Kim Eung Won aka Soho (1855-1921). Orchids are an ancient Korean symbol of purity, modesty, and virtue. The rock symbolizes eternity, so the combination of orchids and rock have the meaning of eternal adherence to principle. The orchid grows in remote places, but its fragrance spreads over the land, just as the scholar often works in isolation, but through their scholarly and ethical works their influence is felt throughout the land. Talented painters of orchids were and still are held in the highest regard. Though Daewongun (Prince Yi Ha Eung) is often cited as the greatest painter of orchids, most scholars now agree it was Kim Eung Won who was creating many of the paintings for which Prince Daewongun took credit and which Daewongun signed. Daewongun was, of course, a great painter of orchids, but most agree now that Kim Eung Won may deserve the title of greatest. His paintings sell for a fraction of the price of Daewongun's paintings, at least for now. That can be expected to change as the general public catches up with the scholarship on the subject. The second photo here is from a sale at another gallery where the prices on much smaller and simpler paintings by Kim Eung Won are double the price we are asking here for this larger and finer painting. Ink on paper. 54 x 14 inches, 137.5 x 35.5 cm unmounted. (A much smaller Daewongun painting sold at Christie's for $12,500 on March 18, 2014).
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Korean : Paintings : Pre 1900 item #1472809 (stock #1495)
Korean Art and Antiques
SOLD
This pair of painted portraits depicts the newlywed Justice Minister Choi Seok-min (1858-1915) and his wife. The level of photo-like realism in these paintings is astounding. 19th Century portraits of women are exceedingly scarce. This is the only example we have ever seen offered for sale. The documentation pictured here is included with this pair of portraits. Each painting is 49 x 18 inches, 124.5 x 45.5 cm.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Korean : Paintings : Pre 1900 item #1472532 (stock #1493)
Korean Art and Antiques
SOLD
A Rare Tour-de-Force Masterpiece Ten-Panel Painting by the Renowned 19th Century Korean Royal Court Artist Yang Ki Hun aka Sukyeon (1843-1898). This is the first Yang Ki Hun screen painting offered for sale outside of Korea in many years, and it is arguably the best of them. We have here the most renowned of the 19th Century Korean royal court painters demonstrating his mastery and artistry in all of the most revered scholar's motifs. The few other screens of his we have seen in the market over the years were limited to one motif for the entire screen. Each of the ten paintings in this screen is a different motif, but the master brings unity to the entire composition as well with a consistent visual flow that naturally leads the eye from one masterpiece painting to the next. These paintings are unmounted and ready to be framed or mounted onto a screen or rolled up, stored and conserved for their artistic, historical, and cultural value. Each painting is 48.5 x 11.5 inches (123.5 x 29 cm). Ink on paper. The fourth photo here shows the market price for individual Yang Ki Hun paintings and should give you an idea of how very attractive the price is on this set of ten paintings.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Korean : Paintings : Pre 1900 item #1472519 (stock #1492)
Korean Art and Antiques
SOLD
We have been trying since we opened 18 years ago to acquire a Kim Gyu Jin painting, but they are all either stored in museums or firmly entrenched in private collections. His works are in the collections of the world's biggest museums, including the Metropolitan Museum and the British Museum. There is just one other one on the market, as shown in the last photo here. It is also an orchids painting and it is being offered by a retiring gallery owner for a price reduced from $9000.00 to a "sale" price of $6500.00. So it is with great pride that we offer for the first time a painting by Korean Joseon Dynasty Royal Court artist Kim Gyu Jin. This painting is a fine example of the range of Kim Gyu Jin's brushwork, from dynamic sweeping strokes to quietly rendered details. Kim Gyu Jin aka Haegang (1868-1933) had a tremendous influence on Korean art through his paintings, the art organization he founded (Seohwa Hyeophoe Calligraphy and Painting Association), and his textbooks that became canon in art studies. He taught painting and calligraphy to King Gojong and to the crown prince and he was commissioned by King Sukjong to paint the murals at Changdok Palace. Orchids are an ancient Korean symbol of purity, modesty, and virtue. The rock symbolizes eternity, so the combination of orchids and rock have the meaning of eternal adherence to principle. The orchid grows in remote places, but its fragrance spreads over the land, just as the scholar often works in isolation, but through their scholarly and ethical works their influence is felt throughout the land. Talented painters of orchids were and still are held in the highest regard, and Kim Gyu Jin is unanimously regarded as one of the best. Ink on paper. Scroll Mounting: 79 x 20.5 inches (201 x 52 cm), 54 x 13.5 inches (137 x 34 cm).
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Korean : Paintings : Pre 1910 item #1471629 (stock #1490)
Korean Art and Antiques
$9,000.00
Rare and Fine Painting on Silk of Dokseong, The Hermit Saint, from the renowned Charles J. Chu Collection. Sold on June 25, 2010 in Skinner's Asian Works of Art auction (Sale 2512, Lot 445). We sold the last Dokseong painting we had to the Art Institute of Chicago. This is a rare opportunity to acquire a beautiful and important painting with an impeccable provenance. Dokseong is portrayed here in a heavenly landscape filled with ancient symbolism, as he sits under the pine tree (symbol of longevity) with a stack of books, beside peonies (symbol of wealth, in this case, a wealth of knowledge and natural beauty), in front of waterfalls and a river (symbols of eternal life), atop a rocky plateau with freshly blooming orchids (orchids are an ancient Korean symbol of purity, modesty, and virtue; rocks symbolizes eternity; so the combination of orchids and rocks have the meaning of eternal adherence to principle). His robe is adorned with clouds (symbol of longevity) and chrysanthemums (symbol of abundance). The chrysanthemums are echoed in the bookshelves. The melons and pomegranates atop the books are fruits with many seeds, so they symbolize plenty. In this case, they represent nature's abundance. Frame: 42 x 33 inches (107 x 84 cm), Painting: 36.5 x 27.25 inches (93 x 69 cm).
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Korean : Paintings : Pre 1900 item #1416777 (stock #1435)
Korean Art and Antiques
$2,000.00
Fine 19th Century Korean Royal Court Painting of Children at Play. This genre of Korean paintings always displays children playing in imaginary Chinese court costumes, and is called Baekdongja-do in Korean. From the ground-breaking Auspicious Spirits, Korean Folk Paintings exhibition catalogue: "Depicting the children as court nobility expressed an auspicious desire that one's own children achieve success in life." This exceptional example was displayed in the room of a wife in the Korean royal court to inspire her to become pregnant and to have healthy, playful, and successful children. It was also displayed on the first birthday of each child. Ink and colors on silk. 40 x 14.5 inches, 101.5 x 37 cm.